Mickey Reichenbach

Michael Neal Reichenbach better known as “Mickey” grew up to be an athlete. A Taylor native. he was  a member of the Taylor Ducks 1971 Baseball State Runner-Up and 1972 Baseball State Championship teams. But some may not know that he accomplished more once he got to college at the University of Texas at Austin.

As a first baseman in college Reichenbach is most known for winning the 1975 College World Series Most Outstanding Player award his sophomore year with the Longhorns. He hit .455 with three doubles and a home run to earn the honor.  The home run was a two-run shot against South Carolina in the championship game on June 14. He is one of six players from University of Texas at Austin to win that award. The Longhorns came back after losing Game 7 in the tournament to Arizona State to win the College World Series.

Reichenbach was drafted on two separate occasions. The first time, by the Texas Rangers in the 31st round of the 1975 amateur draft. He chose not to sign. When he was taken in the 14th round of the 1977 amateur draft, again by Texas he did sign. He played three years in the minors as a pitcher, never reaching the big leagues.

In 1977, he played for the Daytona Beach Islanders, going 3-2 with a 2.77 ERA. He played for the Fort Myers Royals and Jacksonville Suns in 1978, going 6-7 with a 3.93 ERA in 15 games with the Royals and 2-1 with a 2.00 ERA in seven games with the Suns.

In 1979, his final professional season, he again played for the Fort Myers Royals and Suns, and also with the Bakersfield Outlaws.

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